Wee Three Belize

One of the most “classic” topics studied by cultural anthropologists is kinship. Back in the discipline’s history, we find Lewis Henry Morgan taking care to decipher the many complex ways human societies trace our relatedness to one another. In Santa Cruz village in southern Belize, families are commonly large and extended, with the term “cousin” and “granny” applied generously to many. Children grow up with co-madres and co-padres, godparents who have a special set of bonds and responsibilities, and shares meals, sleeping spaces and playtime with each other reflecting these relationships. These photographs illustrate some of the different ways and moments in which three children might be related. Whether walking home from school, navigating a cave exploration or attending a wedding, the kinship bonds guiding the family’s network of relationships are flexible and complex- and often subtly apparent, even in the everyday.

Kristina Baines is our resident cool anthropologist. She’s been formally trained in applied, sociocultural, ecological and medical anthropology at Florida Atlantic University (BA, MA), the University of Oxford (MSc) and the University of South Florida (PhD). She has a strong interest in corn, how what we do in our environment makes us well, and using innovative methods to make anthropology relevant and accessible to a wide audience. You can find out more about how these interests translate into projects and pursuits by perusing the rest of our site, or you can contact her directly at kristina@coolanthropology.com

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